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Ethical accessory supports end to global hunger Fashion blog uk | Men’s clothes | Women’s Clothes| Blog online

Ethical accessory supports end to global hunger

Have you heard about the latest ethical accessory? It’s for the Enough Food For Everyone IF campaign, and all the latest celebrities are wearing them.

Celebrities support the Big IF

Erin O’Connor, Rita Ora, Conor Maynard, Reggie Yates, Dermot O’Leary, Bonnie Wright, Lauren Laverne and Tom Hiddleston are coveting a new ethical accessory. A full recycled wristband that is also helping to raise awareness of global hunger.

Celebrities are making the IF wristband their chosen accessory for this spring to support a major campaign by Britain’s leading development charities.

‘Enough Food for Everyone IF’ is the largest coalition of its kind in the UK since Make Poverty History in 2005. The campaign is calling for world leaders to end the scandal that sees one in eight people go to bed hungry every night when they gather at the G8 summit in the UK in June.

Stars of fashion, screen and music are proud to display the first fundraising wristband that is both made in the UK and 100% recyclable. With removable ‘IFlet’ pins available in four different colours, the band can also be customized by the wearer.

Thousands of people UK-wide are expected to be wearing the bands in support of the campaign in the lead up to the G8 summit and the BIG IF London on Saturday 8 June in Hyde Park.

IF campaign supporter, Reggie Yates said; “It’s hard to believe that 1 in 8 people will go to bed hungry tonight. It’s a shocking statistic, but it’s true. Millions of people across the world go hungry every single day, but in 2013 we have the power to help change that for good. I’ve met families in Kenya living in poverty and have seen first-hand the immediate hardship and pain caused by hunger. Make your voice heard at the #BigIFLondon on Saturday 8th June in Hyde Park, and be part of a noise against hunger the G8 leaders can’t ignore.”

Wristbands are available at enoughfoodif.org/shop or at Oxfam and Save the Children shops nationwide for a suggested donation of £1 each. Supporters have a choice of four logo colours for their wristband and should they wish to customize this further they can get three extra logos for a suggested donation of 50p.

 

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Categories: fashion trends Tags: ,

Bangladesh building disaster update Fashion blog uk | Men’s clothes | Women’s Clothes| Blog online

Bangladesh building disaster update

As the death toll hit 900, there has been some good news to come out of Bangladesh. Find out how the fashion industry has responded.

Protests at Primark

Last week War on Want announced that global retailers, including Primark, H&M, Tesco, Zara and C&A, have bowed to pressure and signed the Bangladesh Safety Accord.

Tens of thousands called on Primark to sign the agreement. This is a momentous deal and people power made it happen.

A spokesperson for War on Want said: “The terrible scale of this tragedy has shone the spotlight on the garment industry. But the truth is that every day, across the world, women are slaving away in appalling conditions to make our clothes. Now is our chance to make the retailers live up to their responsibility.”

Meanwhile, Ecouterre announced that Bangladesh’s government have agreed to allow their 4 million garment workers to form trade unions without seeking permission from factory owners. This is a milestone victory for labour-rights campaigners who have been lobbying for widespread reforms to the industry.

The decision came a day after Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina’s administration announced a plan to raise the minimum wage for garment workers, who are paid as little as $38 per month. This is a quarter of China’s current minimum wage.

This is all amazing news, but there are still garment workers who are working in appalling conditions. Our 1% campaign continues, and we urge you to sign the petition. If you’ve already signed then please share it on your social networks so we can bring as many people as possible together under this drive.

Jfashion.co.uk

Categories: fashion trends, Women's clothes Tags:

Fashion’s Dirty Secrets goes on tour Fashion blog uk | Men’s clothes | Women’s Clothes| Blog online

Fashion’s Dirty Secrets goes on tour

Our hit photography exhibition, Fashion’s Dirty Secrets, goes on tour. Next month it will be at Bristol’s Big Green Week.

Fashion's Dirty secrets photo montage

Last year we ran a exhibition called Fashion’s Dirty Secrets, featuring photos that revealed exploitation in the fashion industry. The photos were donated by leading non-profit organisations, including ActionAid, Greenpeace, Traid, and Anti-Slavery International.

As well as raising awareness of the issues, the exhibition helped raise hundreds for the charities involved.

The event was so popular that we’ve been working with partners to take it further afield. We’re pleased to say that thanks to FareShare South West and Bristol Fairtrade it will be part of the Big Green Week at Bristol.

As well as the chance to see the exhibition, there will also be a gala evening of eco-fashion, inspiring speakers, and a sustainably sourced banquet, to officially launch the Festival, sponsored by the Co-operative Membership.

This unique evening will feature a Fashion Show with the latest up-cycled and Fairtrade trends, alongside local and national designers that work exclusively in eco-fashion, including Arthur and Henry, The Birdcage, BohoHemp and Clic Sargent Fix Up, Look Sharp.

There will also be a fantastic buffet dinner, sponsored by Sustain, cooked with food that would have been wasted –  the buffet will feature 15 delicious dishes to choose from such as Chicken roasted with Sumac, Za’atar and Lemon, Baby Aubergines stuffed with Nuts and Spice, cooked in a Tomato sauce and a choice of delicious desserts, topped off with Fairtrade wines and juices.

This glamorous evening  will be wrapped up with delectable free goody bags full of sustainable products!

Your all inclusive £25 ticket for the gala launch evening includes a free drink on arrival, Fashion Show, buffet dinner, and the free goody bag.

To book tickets visit the Big Green Week website

Categories: fashion trends Tags: ,

Fashion’s Dirty Secrets goes on tour Fashion blog uk | Men’s clothes | Women’s Clothes| Blog online

Fashion’s Dirty Secrets goes on tour

Our hit photography exhibition, Fashion’s Dirty Secrets, goes on tour. Next month it will be at Bristol’s Big Green Week.

Fashion's Dirty secrets photo montage

Last year we ran a exhibition called Fashion’s Dirty Secrets, featuring photos that revealed exploitation in the fashion industry. The photos were donated by leading non-profit organisations, including ActionAid, Greenpeace, Traid, and Anti-Slavery International.

As well as raising awareness of the issues, the exhibition helped raise hundreds for the charities involved.

The event was so popular that we’ve been working with partners to take it further afield. We’re pleased to say that thanks to FareShare South West and Bristol Fairtrade it will be part of the Big Green Week at Bristol.

As well as the chance to see the exhibition, there will also be a gala evening of eco-fashion, inspiring speakers, and a sustainably sourced banquet, to officially launch the Festival, sponsored by the Co-operative Membership.

This unique evening will feature a Fashion Show with the latest up-cycled and Fairtrade trends, alongside local and national designers that work exclusively in eco-fashion, including Arthur and Henry, The Birdcage, BohoHemp and Clic Sargent Fix Up, Look Sharp.

There will also be a fantastic buffet dinner, sponsored by Sustain, cooked with food that would have been wasted –  the buffet will feature 15 delicious dishes to choose from such as Chicken roasted with Sumac, Za’atar and Lemon, Baby Aubergines stuffed with Nuts and Spice, cooked in a Tomato sauce and a choice of delicious desserts, topped off with Fairtrade wines and juices.

This glamorous evening  will be wrapped up with delectable free goody bags full of sustainable products!

Your all inclusive £25 ticket for the gala launch evening includes a free drink on arrival, Fashion Show, buffet dinner, and the free goody bag.

To book tickets visit the Big Green Week website

Categories: fashion trends Tags: ,

How the High Street rates on ethics Fashion blog uk | Men’s clothes | Women’s Clothes| Blog online

How the High Street rates on ethics

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Following the Bangladesh building disaster, the Guardian produced an ethical guide to the High Street. We’ve added a few thoughts of our own.

Oxord street london

Knowledge is power, so they say. And in the world of fashion things can be so confusing it’s hard to know who the good guys and bad guys are.

Thankfully The Guardian have come along to share their thoughts with us. Their excellent guide on ethical shopping on the High Street, provides some pearls of wisdom. However we wanted to share a few more to help you make those important choices.

H&M
The Guardian says
: Praise has been heaped on H&M for being the first to sign the legally binding Bangladesh Safety Accord. Once H&M led the way as the biggest player in Bangladesh, it became obvious other major brands would follow. H&M appears to have shown willingness to be more transparent and released a partial list of its suppliers. Campaigners want to see equally decisive action on paying a living wage to workers.

We say: A pretty decent summary of H&M by The Guardian. It’s important to note that while H&M have a number of green initiatives, they are still slow to progress human rights. The Clean Clothes Campaign raised this point beautifull in their recent Unconscious Collection advert spoof.

Top Shop/Arcadia
The Guardian says: 
It is widely acknowledged that Topshop has many good people with an appetite for ethical change; there have been some interesting ethical design collections from Topshop. However, the analysts I spoke to couldn’t separate Topshop from parent company Arcadia. Arcadia had not signed the Bangladesh accord at the time of going to press, and never joined the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) – considered the first step to cleaning up the supply chain.

We say: Top Shop have also failed to sign the Cotton Pledge, regarding the use of Uzbekistan cotton, widely known to be rife with child exploitation. The company have also been blasted by groups like UK Uncut for avoiding millions in tax.

Zara/Inditex
The Guardian says: Insiders suggest Inditex is a mixed bag. It scores strongly for having compensated the victims of the Spectrum factory collapse in Bangladesh in 2005, and is known for having good relationships with trade unions, particularly in Europe. However, it isn’t clear what proportion of its clothes are manufactured in Europe. Reformers argue that Inditex has a charge to answer in that it was one of the key drivers of the new, faster fashion and the short-termism that is often bad news for workers.

We say: Zara recently redeemed themselves by promising to act on toxic dyes in their supply chain, following a campaign by Greenpeace. However just weeks later they were blasted in a slavery scandal in Argentina. Yet again a brand acts on environmental issues while sweeping human rights under the carpet.

M&S
The Guardian says: Has a plan (“Plan A” in fact) and is praised by reformers for pushing forward without waiting for crises. It is known for stable, long-term relationships with supplier factories.

M&S is the only major retailer to have committed to ensuring its suppliers are able to pay workers a living wage in the least-developed countries, starting with Bangladesh, India and Sri Lanka by 2015. But campaigners said they don’t yet know what M&S considers a living wage to be. They also want to see less emphasis on making garment workers more productive in return for better wages, and more emphasis just on better wages. M&S has signed the Bangladesh accord.

We say: Last year’s slavery scandal involving M&S did little to earn our love or trust of the company. It also throws any agreement about a living wage into serious doubt. While they have worked with the Indian Government to improve conditions for those working in apprenticeships, there are still serious black holes in their supply chain.

George at Asda (Walmart)
The Guardian says: 
Walmart, owner of Asda, has worked on raising wages for garment workers, particularly after being singled out by campaign groups such as War on Want. This work tended to focus on increasing productivity.

Campaigners suggest Walmart is ideologically opposed to unions. Walmart has not signed the Bangladesh agreement, but will conduct its own inspections of suppliers.

We say: Walmart tends to be a little off the radar for most Brits, despite it owning one of our major supermarket chains. However in the US campaigners are hot on its trail. Although the company has made some moves to improve its supply chain, labour rights groups remain skeptical.

>> Is there anything we’ve missed? If you have information about a brand, good or bad, then let us know in the comments section below.

>> Finding this all a bit depressing? Then check out our directory for brands that do good.

 

Photo: Mad Lunatic

 

Categories: fashion trends Tags: ,

How the High Street rates on ethics Fashion blog uk | Men’s clothes | Women’s Clothes| Blog online

How the High Street rates on ethics

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google_ad_client = "ca-pub-6231489572734247"; /* Post header 468×60 */ google_ad_slot = "2064255607"; google_ad_width = 468; google_ad_height = 60;
// ]]>
// <![CDATA[

// ]]>
Following the Bangladesh building disaster, the Guardian produced an ethical guide to the High Street. We’ve added a few thoughts of our own.

Oxord street london

Knowledge is power, so they say. And in the world of fashion things can be so confusing it’s hard to know who the good guys and bad guys are.

Thankfully The Guardian have come along to share their thoughts with us. Their excellent guide on ethical shopping on the High Street, provides some pearls of wisdom. However we wanted to share a few more to help you make those important choices.

H&M
The Guardian says
: Praise has been heaped on H&M for being the first to sign the legally binding Bangladesh Safety Accord. Once H&M led the way as the biggest player in Bangladesh, it became obvious other major brands would follow. H&M appears to have shown willingness to be more transparent and released a partial list of its suppliers. Campaigners want to see equally decisive action on paying a living wage to workers.

We say: A pretty decent summary of H&M by The Guardian. It’s important to note that while H&M have a number of green initiatives, they are still slow to progress human rights. The Clean Clothes Campaign raised this point beautifull in their recent Unconscious Collection advert spoof.

Top Shop/Arcadia
The Guardian says: 
It is widely acknowledged that Topshop has many good people with an appetite for ethical change; there have been some interesting ethical design collections from Topshop. However, the analysts I spoke to couldn’t separate Topshop from parent company Arcadia. Arcadia had not signed the Bangladesh accord at the time of going to press, and never joined the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) – considered the first step to cleaning up the supply chain.

We say: Top Shop have also failed to sign the Cotton Pledge, regarding the use of Uzbekistan cotton, widely known to be rife with child exploitation. The company have also been blasted by groups like UK Uncut for avoiding millions in tax.

Zara/Inditex
The Guardian says: Insiders suggest Inditex is a mixed bag. It scores strongly for having compensated the victims of the Spectrum factory collapse in Bangladesh in 2005, and is known for having good relationships with trade unions, particularly in Europe. However, it isn’t clear what proportion of its clothes are manufactured in Europe. Reformers argue that Inditex has a charge to answer in that it was one of the key drivers of the new, faster fashion and the short-termism that is often bad news for workers.

We say: Zara recently redeemed themselves by promising to act on toxic dyes in their supply chain, following a campaign by Greenpeace. However just weeks later they were blasted in a slavery scandal in Argentina. Yet again a brand acts on environmental issues while sweeping human rights under the carpet.

M&S
The Guardian says: Has a plan (“Plan A” in fact) and is praised by reformers for pushing forward without waiting for crises. It is known for stable, long-term relationships with supplier factories.

M&S is the only major retailer to have committed to ensuring its suppliers are able to pay workers a living wage in the least-developed countries, starting with Bangladesh, India and Sri Lanka by 2015. But campaigners said they don’t yet know what M&S considers a living wage to be. They also want to see less emphasis on making garment workers more productive in return for better wages, and more emphasis just on better wages. M&S has signed the Bangladesh accord.

We say: Last year’s slavery scandal involving M&S did little to earn our love or trust of the company. It also throws any agreement about a living wage into serious doubt. While they have worked with the Indian Government to improve conditions for those working in apprenticeships, there are still serious black holes in their supply chain.

George at Asda (Walmart)
The Guardian says: 
Walmart, owner of Asda, has worked on raising wages for garment workers, particularly after being singled out by campaign groups such as War on Want. This work tended to focus on increasing productivity.

Campaigners suggest Walmart is ideologically opposed to unions. Walmart has not signed the Bangladesh agreement, but will conduct its own inspections of suppliers.

We say: Walmart tends to be a little off the radar for most Brits, despite it owning one of our major supermarket chains. However in the US campaigners are hot on its trail. Although the company has made some moves to improve its supply chain, labour rights groups remain skeptical.

>> Is there anything we’ve missed? If you have information about a brand, good or bad, then let us know in the comments section below.

>> Finding this all a bit depressing? Then check out our directory for brands that do good.

 

Photo: Mad Lunatic

 

Categories: fashion trends Tags: ,

Dirty White Gold – the cotton suicides Fashion blog uk | Men’s clothes | Women’s Clothes| Blog online

Dirty White Gold – the cotton suicides

A feature length documentary exposing the suicide scandal in the Indian cotton industry, is set to hit the big screen. The production crew share with us their trials to get it there.

dirty white gold

It took a month, 5000 miles, some chapatti and a view into the less pleasant side of the fashion industry. But the film Dirty White Gold, about suicides in the Indian cotton industry, is finally in the can.

During their trip the film crew visited the factory producing shirts for ethical fashion label, Arthur & Henry. It was their chance to see a transparent supply chain in action.

On the flip side, they also saw many cases where brands had no sense of responsibility and rely on subcontractors to disassociate themselves from the realities of their production chains.

They also visited to a breeding facility where GM cotton seeds are created – never mind seed to shop, it’s likely that your pants started life in a petri dish!

As well as learning much about the shady origins of our clothes, director, Leah also mastered the art of chapatti making. She was taught by Kantabai, a widow she first met last August – three weeks after her cotton farmer husband killed himself.

Dirty White Gold is set to be one of the most important documentaries about the fashion industry out this year. It’s a must see for anyone who cares about fashion and ethics.

To find out more about the film, including when and where it’s due to be screened, visit their Facebook group or follow them on Twitter at  @dirtywhitegold 

Photo: Dirty White Gold

Categories: fashion trends Tags: ,